This webpage and all outside links on this site are provided for your convenience and information purposes only. Nothing on this website constitutes or is meant to constitute advice of any kind. Except as expressly set forth herein, BLOCKS makes no representations or warranties, express or implied, at law or in equity, including with respect to merchantability or fitness for any particular purpose, as to the accuracy, reliability or completeness of any furnished data. Some of the links you will be directed to may contain live references (or additional pointers) to information created and maintained by other organizations. Unless otherwise stated, these links do not in any way, imply BLOCKS’ affiliation with, endorsement of, or connection of any kind to the linked sites and their content, nor are we in any way responsible for any changes to, and/or any individual's interpretation or use thereof. BLOCKS does not control and cannot guarantee the relevance, timeliness or accuracy of these outside materials and any such other representations or warranties are hereby expressly disclaimed. BLOCKS shall have no liability whatsoever relating to or resulting from the use of information or for any errors, omissions, or inaccuracies provided in the information.


Last Updated 6 July 2015

Hawaii

North Dakota

Preparedness


Being prepared for disaster is critical.  BLOCKS provides Emergency Operation Plan development, testing, and training support. There is no one-size-fits-all template for childcare, as each childcare differs in composition, structure boundaries, and risks faced.  Additionally, the requirements or hazards within each state also vary.


The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) recommends that childcare organizations plan for natural disasters, but manmade, medical and threatening child safety situations need to be planned for as well. BLOCKS defines "threatening child safety situations" as situations that could include  but are not limited to: abducted or missing children, active shooter or hostile intruders, bomb threats, suspicious packages, disgruntled/impaired employees, parent/guardians or representatives, or a hostage situation.


In addition to planning for specific (and individually applicable) hazards, it is important that Emergency Operations Plans (EOPs) and Emergency Action Plans (EAPs) include functional annexes that provide and standardize clear and  easily executable procedures for  evacuations, family re-unification, lock down and shelter in place situations.


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Washington

Wisconsin

Michigan

Contact us:  1 (844) 717-0642

                            (360) 801-8566

Mississippi

Rhode Island

Oregon

Oklahoma

Alabama

Colorado

Wyoming

South 

Utah

Maryland

The following graphic provides links to templates created by representative state or city emergency management agencies to help with childcare EOP development (seen in red below).  Some sites below provide checklists or training material vice templates - this difference is highlighted with an "*" next to the state name. BLOCKS will post updates as we receive them.


We welcome your feedback and input. BLOCKS is working to create a "best practice" template for the five different types of childcare organizations. Please email us at Contact@BlocksUSA.org for help on creating your EOP or with updated information.

South Dakota

Illinois

Carolina

​BLOCKS
Building Links between Offices of emergency management, Childcare, and the community for Kids Safety

FEMA has developed the following child care EOP and EAP templates for use.​​

New Mexico

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